Shopping News: Beauty Line Kari Gran Debuts, Plus Meet The Kippy Ding Ding Fashion Truck

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Happy (almost) holiday! Once the fireworks shows end and we nap off our food-induced comas, take some time to check out the following new beauty and style finds:

 A few months back, I visited the divine little Honeysuckle Spa near Green Lake. Not only did owner Molly Griffith give me an insanely awesome organic facial (so, call her maybe), but gave me a great tip, too: There was a eco skin care company in the works over on Queen Anne. And now, Kari Gran is here; the line crafted with organic, non-GMO and wild-harvested ingredients. With offerings like cleansing oil ($25), lavender hydrating face tonic ($20-$35) and smooth cinnamon-pimenta lip whip gloss ($15), I am officially obsessed with this new line.

Another fun beauty find to cross my desk this week: Seven Salon’s new beach spray. Perfect for creating those loose, sexy waves you get after a day at the beach, the spray is packed with pro-vitamin B5, plankton extract (for scalp nourishment), plus seaweed and kelp extract. I test drove the spritzer this morning and love my natural, summery waves.

Beep, beep: Keep your eyes peeled for the weekend debut of Seattle’s first “fashion truck”, The Kippy Ding Ding. Friends Amanda Linton and Allison Norris have revamped an old vintage trailer and outfitted her with fancy vintage duds for sale (from the looks of their Facebook page, they have a goods taste, too). The trailer will start scooting around town starting this Friday, where it will make its debut at the Fremont Art Walk in the 509 Wines parking lot. 

Additional photos courtesy of Kari Gran and Seven Salon

New Skincare Company, 3B, Delivers Beauty by the Boxful

New Skincare Company, 3B, Delivers Beauty by the Boxful

A Seattle-based skin care company brings beauty breakthroughs to your door
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Goodies from a 3B beauty box

Ke Chen, cofounder of 3B (Beauty Beyond Borders), says skin care in Asia is approached the same way the French think about food. “It’s an art form,” she says. Chen, whose Seattle-based subscription beauty box company launched last year, says this “art form” can include a 10-step cleansing ritual and feature innovative, exotic ingredients like bee venom and snail mucus to soothe and repair skin.

 

Chen has found that obtaining these elite Asian skin care products stateside takes time and research, which is why she’s offering them via a home subscription service ($15/month), which delivers a collection of Korean, Taiwanese and Japanese skin care samples, such as the Neogence Hyaluronic Acid Hydrating Lotion from Taiwan and Leaders’ 7 Wonders Amazonian Acai Anti-Pollution Mask from South Korea. When subscribers find a product they can’t live without, they can shop for the full-size product on 3B’s website (the3bbox.com).

Local and national focus groups of bloggers, YouTubers and beauty influencers help Chen keep up on Asian skin care trends and determine what ends up in the boxes. You could say that 3B has skin in this game.